Tutorial: Collaborating with Cartoon Animator to Remotely create a Fully-Animated Cartoon in 2 Weeks

INTRODUCTION

Veteran Cartoon Animator character designer, and 2D animator Garry Pye discusses how he was able to assemble a small group of talented designers, animators and voice over artists working remotely across the globe; to produce a broadcast quality, 2D animated short film from concept-to-finished project in under two weeks using Cartoon Animator.  

Garry Pye – 2D Illustrator / Cartoonist / Animator

GARRY PYE

My name is Garry Pye and since 2014 I have been a content developer for Reallusion. I am privileged to work with a number of talented people, experienced industry seniors from across a wide spectrum of skills in the animation industry. For some time, several of us had floated the idea of collaborating on the production of an animated short film inspired by the television cartoons of our youth.

Problem was, we were all in different parts of the world and couldn’t get together. So we needed to find a way to all work together with a single goal – Cartoon Animator was able to help us achieve this goal. 

It’s fair to say that I like to test myself. Each time I create a new project, I like to focus on specific aspects and set myself goals so I learn new skills. With my new Cartoon Animator G3 360 Degree character Buz Blowfly and his debut film “Steak Out”, I set myself several challenges. 

First, to create a character whose design was incredibly basic and see if I could breathe life and personality into him and create a performance audiences would engage with. I chose Buz Blowfly because he is essentially a blue ball with four little black sticks for legs and little else going on. I thought, if we can make this 2D character look more like a traditional hand animated cell cartoon and less like a cardboard cutout floating aimlessly across the screen from one point to another, then that will be an achievement. 

In addition, there was now the challenge of working remotely with a group of people, each of whom would be required to work independently and provide their input on this animation to make it work, while never having the opportunity to meet together in one place to discuss it. Everyone would have to do their bit, ultimately requiring all the pieces to be assembled as a finished product. 

And finally, the hardest challenge of all. Could we pull this off in under two weeks. Fourteen days from pencil sketch to finished animation.    

Step 1: Creating Buz Blowfly

Buz Blowfly is little more than a blue circle with four sticks for legs. As far as an overall character build, that’s pretty much it. And that was very much a conscious design choice. I wanted the challenge of creating emotions for this character using his face and wings as well as his overall body movements. With only a simple sphere to work with, I would have to experiment with squash and stretch movements, as well as being able to incorporate the Cartoon Animators Deform tool, which I had previously toyed with but never really put to proper use.

After scanning the original pencil sketch into my PC, using CorelDraw I was able to draw bezier curves over the top of the sketch for each required sprite, creating dozens of new mouths and eyes for almost every emotion possible.

One of Cartoon Animator’s greatest abilities is to take any character design and quickly, and easily, add your own internal skeleton framework, complete with joints, so your character moves freely in front of your eyes within minutes. It is a simple matter of dragging your bones about over the top of the character and previewing the results in real time. 

Once the framework of the character and his bone structure was set up, I went about creating the G3 360 Head for Buz as a Talking Head. With this character, his head and body were essentially the same part, meaning his head is also his body. The benefit here was that once I had him set up properly using the 360 Head Creator, Buz would be able to turn his head and look around with natural movement, again making him appear less like a cardboard cutout and more like a hand animated character. 

Setting up the 360 Head for this character is not only easy, but for me extremely fun with Cartoon Animator. Being able to make adjustments to your characters face in real time as you’re building them is so satisfying, sometimes it seems more like sculpting than assembling. The 360 Head Creator gives the animator total control over the movement of the facial parts, which can later be fine tuned further with the Transform and Deform tools during the animation process. 

Step 2:  We Need a Plan!

When working on a larger animation project, planning is essential. Multiple scenes and camera shots require forethought so that continuity is in place and you don’t find yourself having to backtrack to correct mistakes. When working as part of a creative team with a single goal, planning is even more important so all parties know what’s happening and what’s expected of them.

With a story outline and script written, it was time to hit the drawing board with a good old fashioned pencil and paper to roughly sketch out each camera shot in a storyboard sequence so that everyone involved in the project could visualise the cartoon and share their input into how each shot could be made better. 

Since our voiceover actors would never get to record together at the same time, each needed to understand their role in order to deliver a recording that would fit each scene. Having worked many times with both William and Kelsy, I knew any lines of dialogue in their hands were going to be perfect. 

We agreed that the feeling of the cartoon was to be inspired by the old Looney Tunes cartoons of Sylvester and Tweety Pie we had watched on television growing up. So the background elements were kept simple and built inside Cartoon Animator in a way that allowed the Buz Blowfly character to freely move around in the correct perspective. Cartoon Animator gave us the freedom to make changes quickly and easily as each sequence developed and changes were required. One of my absolute favourite functions of this software is the Z-axis which allows correct perspective layering and smooth camera control giving the scenes a depth that would otherwise be extremely difficult to achieve.

Step 3: Veteran Animator brings Buz to Life 

My friend and animator Declan Walsh is a legend in the art of traditional hand drawn animation, having worked with Disney, and Don Bluth, and animating films such as Thumbelina and Anastasia. We felt that the wings on the Buz Blowfly character would be used to express his emotions and almost become a character with a personality of their own. So Declan went about creating the most visually impressive animated wing prop (ctProp) for Cartoon Animator. Hand drawing 17 individual frames of motion, when combined in a sequence, Declan was able to give the wings 4 separate motion speeds that could be used to propel Buz across the screen.    

So while the head and body of Buz was being constructed on one side of the globe, his wings were being developed on the other, and eventually the two would pair up and Buz Blowfly would take his first flight. 

Step 4: Giving the Character’s Voices

I cannot stress enough the importance of using professional voice artists if you want to elevate your animations to a professional level. When we were first exploring the idea of this collaborative project for Buz Blowfly, William Schenold and Kelsy Little jumped at the chance to be involved. I always make sure I have my voiceovers finished before I start frame one of animation because a good audio clip can often steer your scene in a different direction than expected, especially when you have fun people like Bill and Kelsy who like to ad lib and go off script. You never know what you’re in for and often the best line is the one that comes when the actors are goofing off.   

Even though both these talented artists recorded their dialogue in totally different countries and were never able to read together, with Cartoon Animator that doesn’t matter, as I was able to instantly drop in both recordings, align and trim them where necessary and then start my animation process. 

Step 5: Let’s Get Moving

With the storyboards designed, character developed and voice overs recorded, it was now time to start on the final animation. For me, this truly is the fun part. Taking a flat illustration and bringing it to life. Making him twist and turn, express real emotion and interact with the world around him. 

Thanks to Cartoon Animator’s 360 Head feature, I was able to quickly rig Buz Blowfly’s face in real-time, giving him the freedom to look about in every direction and speeding up the animation process by weeks. But for this project, I felt even that wasn’t going to be enough. We needed Buz to move as if he has weight and I wanted his movements to be fast and energetic, while not being so fast that the viewer would miss the action. This is where Cartoon Animator’s Deform Tool became my new best friend. After blocking in the general movements I was able to go back through the scene to squash and stretch everything from Buz’s body to every element of his face, so his performance became much more fluid and life-like. 

Previously I had relied solely on the sprite swapping method for facial expressions, which works perfectly well, but the ability to smoothly transition from one sprite to another through keyframing with the Deform Tool enhanced my character performance to a level I had never achieved before. Because animation is much more than an object moving from one point to another. It is about capturing the true feeling of movement and emotion. And the Deform Tool absolutely delivers this result. 

Step 6: Editing and Effects

With all the clips completed, it was time to assemble the footage into the final cut, which is a simple process of joining each clip together in your favourite editing software. I use Pinnacle for editing and for my sound effects and music I use Audioblocks.

When the movie was complete, the final decision was made to add some effects using Adobe After Effects which would give it the look and feel of being a retro tv cartoon. This is where artist and animator Warwick Hays brought his skill set to the table. Warwick is a master at using After Effects and with the help of Reallusions plug in which quickly and easily creates a bridge between Cartoon Animator and After Effects, Warwick was able to take the original film and desaturate it to give it a more retro look. In addition, he added a blur effect to Buz Blowfly which gave him more natural movement and finally a vintage film grain effect was added to give the project the feeling of being a recording from an original television program. All of this was done in hours rather than days, and results could be increased or decreased in real-time to get just the look we all wanted. 

And We’re Done!

Incredibly, a project that I estimate would have taken several months to complete, had it been created any other way, was finished from pencil sketch to final movie in exactly two weeks, thanks to the passion and enthusiasm of a group of talented artists. And best of all the project was genuinely fun to work on for everyone. This is because Cartoon Animator allowed us to see our results in real-time, making spontaneous adjustments without the need to redo work. All while having fun with the process of collaborating remotely and enjoying animating instead of being impeded with tedious and monotonous technical work. And because we were able to create the project in such record time, it meant that the enthusiasm for the work never had time to wane. 

At the beginning of every new animation I try to push myself to learn new skills, polish those skills I already have and discover new possibilities within the limits of Cartoon Animator. As this software grows with new plug-ins and tools, so does the potential for me to create bigger and better animated projects. And at the end of each project I hope to be able to look back and see growth in my work. ‘Steak Out’ was a journey in collaboration and character animation that ultimately demonstrates Cartoon Animators ability to produce a quality production by a remote team of enthusiastic, creative people in a very short time frame. 

LINKS:

Garry Pye: https://www.facebook.com/garrypyeanimations

Declan Walsh: http://www.declanwalshart.com/

Warwick Hays: https://www.facebook.com/wthanimation/

Kelsy Little: KelsyLittleVO@gmail.com

William Schenold: william@wjschenold.com  

From Explainer Videos to Fun Animated Cartoons – Cartoon Animator Can Do It ALL

David Arandle – 2D Animator / Producer

DAVID ARANDLE

David Arandle, A.K.A. ‘The Extraordinary Tourist’ or ‘TET’ for short is an Independent Artist, Animator, Writer, and Animated Video Producer.

He writes the blog – Animation and Video Life, detailing the behind the scenes of his own animated projects, as well as showcasing animation and video related applications, books, creators, tutorials and other resources for beginner to intermediate animators.

“Cartoon Animator is still focused on making the animation process as easy and fun as possible.”

David Arandle – 2D Animator / Producer

Ward Anderson: Reviving the Retro Look of Beloved TV Cartoons from the 60’s & 70’s with Cartoon Animator

Ward Anderson – 2D Cartoon Animator

Ward Anderson

Using Cartoon Animator, Ward Anderson is reviving the retro look of the much loved television cartoons of the 1960’s and 70’s in a series of short films and music videos.

With a background in writing and performing rather than animating, in this interview Ward explains how Cartoon Animator allows him to get the animation results he wants in faster timeframes, without the extensive knowledge from a background in animation.   

Cartoon Animator has made it possible for me to blend the principles of animation that have been around forever with the efficiency that modern technology has given us. “

Ward Anderson – Comedian / Writer / TV / Radio Host

Tutorial: Cartoon Animator and After Effects – a great combination

INTRODUCTION

Long-time After Effects user and Cartoon Animator power user and content creator, Warwick Hays runs through the process he used to create this Comedy sketch animation, using Cartoon Animator 4 and its huge selection of ready-to-use characters, assets and pre-made character motions to bring them into Adobe After Effects to add a bit of polish to the final animation. 

Warwick Hays

Warwick Hays

My name is Warwick Hays and I’ve been using After Effects for a long time. I have also delved into and creating content with Cartoon Animator for a number of years now, as I am a featured content developer on Reallusion’s Content Store.

I have, in the past, used After Effects to animate characters and have always found it difficult to keep track of keys while keeping my projects simple to manage. Then I found Cartoon Animator’s quick, simple and a short learning curve. All I needed was an easier way to get what I created in Cartoon Animator back into After Effects to be able to add a layer of effects and post-processing.. 

With the recent release of the Cartoon Animator to After Effects plugin EVERYTHING is much easier. I wanted to show how I use some of the key features in both software packages to produce fast character animation and add a few ‘bells and whistles’ to the animation at the end.

Animator and Content Developer combines the power of 3D into a 2D World

Warwick Hays

Combining wonderful 3D renders with 2D animation and post production effects created in Adobe After Effects, animator Warwick Hays is pushing the limits of Cartoon Animator to create stunning animations and content for 2D animators.

In this interview with Reallusion, Warwick discusses both his current works and motivations behind his planned future projects.

“Cartoon Animator allows me to take the best of 3D and combine it to make the best in 2D.”

Warwick Hays – 2D & 3D Animator / Content Developer

Disney eFX and Renown Traditional Cell Animator discovers Cartoon Animator

Declan Walsh | Animator 2D/3D – Painter digitally and traditionally – Graphic Artist.

Declan Walsh

Declan has worked on eight features for renown American film director – Don Bluth, both in Ireland and the USA for Fox Animation as a director. More recent works have been for animated efx on Disney titles such as Marvel’s Thor, Epic Mickey, KHO online, Anastasia and Wreck-It Ralph.

Well-known as a traditional cell animator Declan Walsh has worked with the biggest names in the 2D animation industry, and now uses Cartoon Animator to produce animated effects and more.

In this interview with Reallusion, Declan discusses his history in the field of animating and why he chose Cartoon Animator as his new animation software.

“When I started using Cartoon Animator, I was really impressed by its ability to bring the old and the new ways together. I was amazed by how little time it took to produce a head rotation, or to match expressions to character’s faces. This type of thing would have taken up so much of my time had I gone down the traditional route!”

Declan Walsh | Animator 2D/3D – Painter digitally and traditionally – Graphic Artist

Creating a Web Series with Cartoon Animator

DEB ETHIER

Deb Ethier began making short animated films in 2016, with quirky stop-motion comedies including quirky characters like Yorick, the skull from Hamlet, who, disgruntled by the lack of opportunity for him at the Globe, headed off into the big, wide world.

These early films were developed into the web series, “22 Bones”, in addition to which Deb has created several animated shorts including “The Masque of the Red Death” which was selected by several festivals and won awards at specialty competitions. 

Deb’s work was also awarded the Judges Prize in the Reallusion Animation at Work Competition.

“There is nothing more satisfying than seeing my characters come to life. Cartoon Animator 4 was exactly what I was looking for!”

Deb Ethier – 2D Animator

Creating Children’s Television with Cartoon Animator 4

Chris Meyer-White / 2D Cartoon Animator

Christopher Meyer-White

Based in the heart of Bristol – Qu Studios and owner Christopher Meyer-White have set out to create versatile spaces for filmmakers.

With a long standing background in children’s media, Chris’ achievements demonstrate how Cartoon Animator 4 can help creative minds develop successful large projects for commercial purpose.

Cartoon Animator 4 has proven itself a valuable tool in Chris’ production, allowing him to develop broadcast quality 2D animation without the need for excessive work time, thanks to its smooth work flow and wide range of professional tools. In his interview with Reallusion, Chris shares insights into his work and his passion for 2D animation

“A flawless pipeline from Photoshop to Cartoon Animator 4 that makes character creating fun, easy and enjoyable””

Chris Meyer-White / 2D Cartoon Animator

Cartoon Animator 4 Music Videos inspired by MTV Generation

Steve Cavalcanti

STEVE CAVALCANTI

Steve Cavalcanti is a Brazilian artist living in the United Kingdom for the past 20 years.

With a background in photography and traditional illustration, Steve created Tivo Studios four years ago, using his skills to create adult animations for a great diversify of topics like musical videos, intros, funny sketches, parodies and social commentary.

“Everything I do has a personal touch.”

Steve Cavalcanti – 2D Animator
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